Lock-down and Diesel Particular Filters (DPF)

Posted on May 5th, 2020 by Rob Marshall

Lock-down and Diesel Particular Filters (DPF)

One major problem with internal combustion engine cars is that they experience significant wear if used only for short journeys https://blog.motoringassist.com/car-maintenance/lock-down-should-you-start-your-engine/ This is one reason why buying a car on mileage alone is not a good idea, which explains a car wearing 50,000 miles could have an engine in better condition than one of the same age with half that figure recorded.

 

While modern diesel engines tend to be more robust than equivalent petrols, all diesel cars made within the last decade will be fitted with Diesel Particulate Filters  https://blog.motoringassist.com/car-maintenance/engine-and-transmission/diesel-particulate-filters/ These trap soot, preventing them from polluting the air, and require an extended journey at consistent higher speeds to burn away the particulates. Obviously, undertaking any journey other than those deemed as essential is not permitted at the moment. Therefore, should you own a diesel car, be wary that multiple short runs (or letting the car idle on your drive to charge its battery especially) will fill the filter.

 

Consider that, should the soot build excessively, the resultant restriction in the exhaust system can cause severe damage. Should your car display a dashboard warning that the filter is filling (and check your handbook for the meaning of such warning, because there is no set standard), take it seriously. As undertaking an extended drive to encourage filter self-cleaning (called ‘regeneration’) could disobey official travelling advice, the best suggestion we can offer is to use a DPF regeneration fuel additive (noting not to overdose it < https://blog.motoringassist.com/car-maintenance/be-wary-of-dpf-additive-overdosing/>). Additionally, combine several short trips into longer ones and minimise cold starts, where possible.